Monthly Blogs 2020

A Path with a Heart

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May, 2020

A Path with a Heart

This is my thirtieth year as a career coach, and my ninth writing blogs. This has been a year like no other. Each of us is navigating personal, professional and community pursuits that have been radically disrupted by the Covid-19 crisis.

Fortunately, most of the suggestions from my nine years of blogging remain valid today. As you prepare for your next step, however, consider one additional tool for your discernment process. This tool consists of just one question, “Does this path have a heart?”

In a time of massive disruption, displacement and political polarization, this question becomes even more important. At risk is our fragile humanity and inherent goodness.

In this blog I will be sharing a book passage by writer Carlos Castaneda. I first read this passage in college, and have returned to it often when facing personal, professional or community decisions.

To help get you in the right mood and mindset, watch this emotionally engaging and inspirational three minute video from Thailand, sent to me by Hilary Beste.

You will hear Thai narration and see English subtitles.

Early in the video, a man puts a donation into the outstretched cup of a small child sitting by her mother. Her sign reads “For Education.”

This is one of many kind acts the man performs in his day.

The Narrator says:

“What does he get in return for doing this every day?

He gets nothing.

He won’t get richer.

Won’t appear on TV.

Still anonymous.

And not a bit more famous.

What he does receive are emotions.

He witnesses happiness.

Reaches a deeper understanding.

Feels the love.

Receives what money can’t buy.

A world made more beautiful.

And in your life,

what is it that you desire most?”

The following passage from The Teachings of Don Juan, by Carlos Castaneda, is about following a path with a heart.

“Anything is one of a million paths. Therefore you must always keep in mind that a path is only a path; if you feel you should not follow it, you must not stay with it under any conditions. To have such clarity you must lead a disciplined life. Only then will you know that any path is only a path and there is no affront, to oneself or to others, in dropping it if that is what your heart tells you to do. But your decision to keep on the path or to leave it must be free of fear or ambition. Look at every path closely and deliberately. Try it as many times as you think necessary.

Does this path have a heart? All paths are the same: they lead nowhere. They are paths going through the bush, or into the bush. In my own life I could say I have traversed long long paths, but I am not anywhere. Does this path have a heart? If it does, the path is good; if it doesn’t, it is of no use. Both paths lead nowhere; but one has a heart, the other doesn’t. One makes for a joyful journey; as long as you follow it, you are one with it. The other will make you curse your life. One makes you strong; the other weakens you.

Before you embark on any path ask the question: Does this path have a heart? If the answer is no, you will know it, and then you must choose another path. A path without a heart is never enjoyable. You have to work hard even to take it. On the other hand, a path with heart is easy; it does not make you work at liking it.”

I encourage you to ask yourself, “Does this path have a heart?” at your next personal, professional or community crossroad. I also suggest you reread and edit the path with a heart passage. Replace the words “a heart” each time they appear in the text with integrity, purpose, love or your own preferred word(s). This exercise will help you find your path of least resistance and greatest fulfillment.

Take care, stay well, and remember to follow your heart.

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Finding Hope in Words & Images from Ireland

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May, 2020

With all the personal losses and unending disruptions that began just a few months ago, this month I write about hope. I have chosen to feature an uplifting new video to help us imagine our world beyond Covid-19, while still grounded in the realities of the present. I have included the video’s background and full script in this blog. Thanks to Hillary Beste for bringing this amazing video to my attention.

Background

Irish actress Eva-Jane Gaffney speaks Sarah Coffey’s words in The Phoenix, a three minute Covid-19 inspired video about love and loss, hope and strength. The production is from Dublin-based creative agency The Tenth Man.

Over a collection of Irish and international film footage, the narrator looks back, grounds us in the present, and asks us to imagine the future.

Sarah Coffey wrote the script after a conversation with her creative director Richard Seabrooke, “We wanted to create something raw and honest that came from the heart, so what you see in the video is my first response, which I wasn’t expecting!”

The Phoenix

When will all this end?

When this will all end…

She sleeps. Our world, she slumbers. Beneath the moon, the stars, the midnight sky, she sleeps, perchance to dream. To her, Mr. Sandman goes.

To us he brings dreams, fever dreams. In dreams we remember what was. We think about what is.We imagine what might be, what can be, what will be. In dreams we see those we love, those we have loved, those we will love. Do you think when this will all end will we love more? Because when this will all end, we will see things we could not have imagined.

We’ll see heroes jaded, and bloody, and exhausted, and sick and tired and glittering and loved. We’ll see entire nations come togetherto honor the bravery of those who showed up day after day, night after night, to serve them.

We’ll see a world coming out of hibernation from behind screens, a world that will stop staring and start again on a life less ordinary. When this will all end we’ll see waterfalls, beaches, crocodiles, speeches. We’ll see birds flying high, sun in the sky, and “Hi Nina, we’ll know how you feel,with a new dawn, new day, new life.” And damn it will feel good.

And when this will all end, our hearts will have broken, with millions of tiny shattered tears.

But hearts are strong, and they’ll mend. And as they do they’ll soldier and soldier and grow and flourish, and sew and flow with our souls together, and these souls will too be stronger because of this, and when this will all end we will all be reunited.

So now just for a minute, Let’s imagine it. The moment you’ll hear that voice again, see that face again, feel that embrace again.

And we will embrace. The old, the young, the family, the friends, the friendly rivals, the rival rivals, those you would not have thought twice about touching before. And we will cry. Oh we will cry. Fat, hot, wet tears will flow down our faces and we will hold each other tight, and for far too long, because when this will all end, it won’t feel right to ever let go again.

And when this will all end, you’ll ask me to dance and I will say yah, let’s dance. For the dawn of a new world, for those we love, for those we have lost, for another chance. And you’ll put on your red shoes and dance my blues away.

And as we sway you’ll look at my eyes with my soul reviving, burning, arising, and those fat hot wet tears will fall and we will never ever forget it and we will never ever let go again.

And this, this will all end.

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Finding Comfort in Music

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April, 2020

Borrowing from the lyrics of Bob Dylan, this month I’ll give you “shelter from the storm.” In difficult times I turn to music for comfort, connection and inspiration.

The songs I will highlight in this blog offer these three elements in ways that only music can. If you click the links, you’ll learn how the songs of Simon and Garfunkel, Marvin Gaye, Carole King, James Taylor and Bill Withers bring me comfort and a whole lot more. You can make your own list of comforting music if you like.

Comfort

Simon and Garfunkel sing Bridge Over Troubled Water,1970

This song came out when we were still in the throes of the Vietnam war, deeply divided as a nation. Music was a unifying force for my generation, and provided the soundtrack for our anti-war protests. Songs like this one offered a reminder that we are not alone in our struggles. It helped us remember our need to comfort and support one another as we bridge to what lies beyond the current struggle.

Why I love this song

Art Garfunkel told Paul Simon that the song needed one more verse. Simon thought he was done after the second verse. He said it was to be “just a simple little hymn.” That final verse helps prepare us for life beyond the struggle, beginning with the words “sail on silver girl.”

In this video, created in January of this year, you will hear the stories behind the song. Included is studio footage from 1970 and present day commentary from Paul Simon, with references to the song’s gospel inspiration and how and why that additional verse was added.

Comfort + Connection

Carole King and James Taylor sing You’ve Got a Friend at the Troubadore in 2010

This is another song from the early 1970s. This video clip is from a wonderful 2010 reunion of the originator, Carole King, and the person who first sang the song commercially, James Taylor.

The late Bill Withers’ Lean On Me was originally written and performed by him in 1972. This version was performed by artists from around the world in 2015.

Why I love these songs and videos

I love how Carole King and James Taylor came together in 2010 to sing You’ve Got a Friend. This is a tribute to their friendship and collaborations over many decades. Their 60+ year old voices are strong and beautifully matched in this video.

I also love how the performing of Lean on Me became an international tapestry in this expertly produced video, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

Minnesota Public Radio recently asked us to sing each of these songs from our open front doors on April 16th (You’ve Got a Friend) and April 24th (Lean on Me.) Public Radio offered us the musical accompaniment, words and the cue to start singing. We followed along with our shared voices to help lift the spirits of our neighborhoods.

Comfort + Innovation + inspiration

Marvin Gaye’s Star Spangled Banner, at the 1983 NBA All-Star Game

You have heard this song hundreds of times, but I bet you have never heard it sung like this. Marvin Gaye takes it to a very special soulful place.

Why I love this version of the song

When Marvin Gaye sang the national anthem his way, he turned a routine, predictable experience upside down. In so doing, he invited us to experience the thrill of transformation along with the comfort of national pride.

Take care and stay well. May your music comfort, connect and inspire you in the challenging and transformational days ahead.

George

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Balancing Head & Heart

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April, 2020

On Monday morning I noticed this headline in the Minneapolis Star Tribune, Trooper’s gesture moves doctor to tears. For a good example of a person whose head and heart are in balance, and in the right place, read what state trooper Brian Schwartz did to move Dr. Sarosh Ashraf Janjua to tears and hope. Have some Kleenex handy.

In this blog I will share two excellent writings, one from an academic and one from a minister. In the first, titled It Might Be, the author helps us rethink what is happening now, and what future implications might be. The second piece is titled Pandemic. It speaks of our hearts and the emotional and spiritual adjustments we can make in light of what we are all experiencing.

It Might Be

by Tanja Draxler, Austrian Academic
Sent to me by art teacher and friend, Amy Hart

It might be that ships in Italian ports will lie idle for the next few days, … but it might also be that dolphins and other marine creatures will finally be allowed to take back their natural habitat. Dolphins have been sighted in Italian ports, the fish are swimming in Venice’s canals again!

It might be that people feel locked up in their houses and apartments, … but it might also be that they are finally singing together again, helping each other and experiencing a sense of community again for a long time. People sing together! This touches me deeply!

It might be that the restriction of air traffic means a deprivation of freedom for many people and brings with it professional restrictions, … but it might also be that the earth breathes a sigh of relief, the sky gains in color and children in China see the blue sky for the first time in their lives. Look at the sky today, how calm and blue it has become!

It might be that the closure of kindergartens and schools is an immense challenge for many parents,…but it might also be that many children have been given the chance to finally become creative themselves, to act more self-determined and to slow down. And also parents may get to know their children on a new level.

It might be that our economy suffers tremendous damage, … but it might also be that we finally realize what is really important in our lives and that constant growth is an absurd idea of the consumer society. We have become the puppets of the economy. It was time to realize how little we actually need.

It might be that you are somehow overwhelmed by this, … but it might also be that you feel that in this crisis lies the chance for a long overdue change, that
– makes the earth breathe again,
– puts children in touch with long forgotten values,
– is slowing our society down enormously,
– can be the birth of a new form of togetherness,
– reduces the mountains of rubbish at least once for the next few weeks,
– and shows us how quickly mother Earth is ready to begin her regeneration if we make people consider her and let her breathe again.

We are shaken up because we were not ready to do it ourselves. Because our future is at stake. It’s about the future of our children!

Pandemic

by Lynn Ungar, Unitarian Minister
Sent to me by U of M professor and friend, Lou Quast

What if you thought of it
as the Jews consider the Sabbath-
the most sacred of times?
Cease from travel.
Cease from buying and selling.
Give up, just for now,
on trying to make the world
different than it is.
Sing. Pray. Touch only those
to whom you commit your life.
Center down.

And when your body has become still,
reach out with your heart.
Know that we are connected
in ways that are terrifying and beautiful.
(You could hardly deny it now.)
Know that our lives
are in one another’s hands.
(Surely, that has come clear.)
Do not reach out your hands.
Reach out your heart.
Reach out your words.
Reach out all the tendrils
of compassion that move, invisibly,
where we cannot touch.

Promise this world your love-
for better or for worse,
in sickness and in health,
so long as we all shall live.

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Balance… What have you done for yourself lately?

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March, 2020

In the next two months I was scheduled to conduct four workshops with this same title. All but one were postponed, like just about everything involving groups over ten people. In this blog I will share a version of my workshop. It feels like the right time for this message.

The inspiration for this workshop comes from Wharton Economist, Adam Grant. In his book Give & Take Grant discusses three broad styles of interpersonal dealing: taking, matching, and giving. Takers are those who try to take more than they give. Matchers are those who try to give and take proportionally and conditionally. Givers are those who give more than they take. Takers are primarily self-oriented, matchers are other-oriented as a means to being self-oriented (I’ll help you, when I think you will help me.) Givers are primarily other-oriented.

Here’s the counter-intuitive part. If we look at the most successful people – the happiest, the most likely to be promoted, etc. – they are generally givers, and if we look at the least successful, they, too, tend to be givers. The failed giver is a person who gives to others, but fails to care for him/ herself.

The most successful givers, according to Grant, are what he calls “otherish” givers. They lead with sincere generosity, but have a healthy selfishness that protects them from burnout, illness, or being taken advantage of.

The first half of this workshop focuses on updating your personal, professional and community giving strategies. The second half focuses on what you want to continue, and what you want to change for your mental, physical, spiritual, financial and relationship well-being.

Leading with Generosity…
Building a legacy of personal, professional and community giving

Over the past thirteen years I have been one of the presenters at Leadership Philadelphia. This is a civic engagement/ leadership development program led by my sister, Liz Dow. In my session I ask the participants to answer this question: “If today was your 75th birthday, and life has gone really well for you, what would people be thanking you for?”

The Leadership Philadelphia program includes a full day of immersion into a different civic theme each month over a ten month period. I tell each participant that one of the most important outcomes of these deep dives is to ultimately discover and pursue their next community calling. Each year I have these 120 for-profit and non-profit leaders do this exercise because their 75th birthday vision can help shape more immediate priorities and actions.

Round one involves asking three imagined 75th birthday guests of your choice what they would like to thank you for. These guests include one each from your personal, professional and community life. Each table guest can be one person, or a composite of multiple people. If you were in this class, what would each representative be thanking you for?

Round two asks these same three people about today. What would each representative suggest you continue to do, and what would each suggest you change in order to achieve your 75th birthday vision? Please note when you do this exercise that each representative may be alive or not. Go ahead, try it.
After you are done, ask yourself, “What do I want to continue, and what do I want to change?”

The Counterbalance to Giving…
What is your well-being/self-care strategy? What have you done for yourself lately?

Key elements of a self-care strategy include our mental, physical, spiritual, financial and relationship wellbeing. Even though we are now more isolated and limited in the things we can do, it is time to find some safe forms of interpersonal, mental, financial, spiritual and physical activities.

What are you reading and watching these days? How are you taking good physical care of yourself? Do you have a spiritual practice? Are you keeping up with your relationships that matter most? Have you found a financial coping strategy, and the right people to discuss this strategy with? There are many good resources and people to tap for ideas.

For some excellent practical and creative advice, take a look at this recent article that includes links to self care resources in most of the areas I have highlighted in this blog: Morning Brew’s Guide to Living Your Best Quarantined Life.

In my workshop, I ask participants to pair up and identify the well-being strengths and strategies they can give to others, and what advice they would like to receive in areas of well- being that they wish to develop and improve.

Summary

I am happy to offer this blog as an alternative to the workshops that were scheduled for the next two months, and have now been postponed due to the coronavirus. I encourage you to try the exercises yourself, and team up (virtually) with others as well. In the workshop I did complete, participants had the opportunity to rethink and adjust their personal, professional and community giving strategies while focusing on the legacy they wish to shape in each of these three areas of life.

Another outcome of the live workshop was participants’ appreciation of at least one strength each had to give and the advice and support they wanted to take to improve their well- being. Each participant also left with an accountability partner to check on their progress the following week.

In addition to rethinking your giving and well-being strategy, please remember to read the article I referenced about living your best quarantined life. It is rich with ideas and links to help you now, and touches on most of the well-being elements highlighted in this blog.

Here is a humorous and helpful coronavirus coping video that came my way this week. Recorded in China, it is a five minute video from a Chinese speaking American comedian, Jesse Appell.

“Laughter is the shortest distance between two people.” Victor Borge

Let me know what you have done for yourself lately. How are you strengthening your well-being while at the same time giving to others? Let’s help one another get through this crisis, by sharing our best ideas and offering support along the way.

Take care, stay well,

George

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